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Adding A Second Layout



My "second" layout is a simple, two turnout affair, in the corner of my office. It's based on the Los Angeles Junction. Structures are removable and I rotate era's.


With so many fascinating rail subjects out there, it's common for modelers to have a broad range of themes, railroads, and era's that appeal to them above and beyond what they have residing in their layout room. Building a (small) second layout can be a way to scratch that itch, a way to explore a secondary interest without committing too many additional resources to the idea. I've done it and gotten a lot of satisfaction out of doing so. If you go that route, here are a few tips to consider:

  • The second layout should be smaller. If you already have a layout in your basement of the UP from Nebraska to California on two decks, you don't need another project on that scale.

  • The second layout doesn't need to provide that much operational potential. It could even be a borderline operational diorama.

  • The second layout should lend itself to a higher level of detail.

  • Assuming it's in an office or a den, you'll want to give it more of a "furniture quality" finish, especially in terms of the fascia, mountin brackets, etc.

  • Don't forget lighting. There are many high quality tape lights on the market today that easily solve that problem.


Example 1: "The Docksider"



Let's take a person that has an interest in waterfront railroading and building ship models. The layout above is only six feet by six feet and would easily fit in the corner of an office. This is not meant to be a massive railroad that sustains three hour op. sessions. It would be a platform for building detailed structures as well as an opportunity to build some vessels. The design is such that it Let's take a person that has an interest in waterfront railroading and building ship models. The layout above is only six feet by six feet and would easily fit in the corner of an office.


This is not meant to be a massive railroad that sustains three hour operating sessions. It would be a platform for building detailed structures as well as an opportunity to build some vessels. The design is such that it would sustain thirty minutes or so of operating as you shuttle cars on and off the pier and into the industry. Because it's relatively small, the pressure would be off to cover vast amounts of surface area. You could take your time and enjoy doing detailed work. You could also swap various ship and structure models on and off the layout.



Example 2: "The New Englander"


At only 18 inches wide by 8 feet long, "The New Englander" is even smaller. Even so, there is a lot of fun to be had with this perennially favorite theme. It would be an excellent platform for scratch building or constructing laser-cut craftsman kits. It could provide an opportunity for working on rolling stock from an earlier era, resin kits, etc. By not permanently mounting the structures, you build a variety of models and cylce them onto the layout over time.


Operationally, there are two ways to go. First, you could build it as is and just utilize it as a diorama. If you have the space and can add a short staging cassette, then some possibilities open up. A train pulls in and then the loco. cuts off and uses the run around track. Cars are then sorted and spotted at the team track, dairy, and fuel dealer.

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